Explore Scientific 82° Series 8.8mm Waterproof Eyepiece - 1.25"

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Explore Scientific 82° Series 8.8mm Waterproof Eyepiece - 1.25"
$149.99
Item # ES-EPWP8288-01
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  • All Explore Scientific eyepieces are optimized to produce high contrast, high resolution, and superior flat field characteristics.
  • The Explore Scientific 82 Series Waterproof N2 Eyepiece is waterproof and nitrogen-purged, to ensure that the internal elements remain clean and dry.
  • All internal surfaces of the eyepiece barrel are flat black, as well as the edges of the lenses themselves, the fully multi-coated to minimize the scattering of light within the lenses.
  • The Explore Scientific 82 Series Eyepiece provides a huge field-of-view and long eye relief by using advanced computer design, combinations of low dispersion and high refractive index optical glasses.
  • Precision machined metal lens barrels that maintain the perfect alignment of the optical train for years of rugged use in the field.
Description

Details

About Explore Scientific 82° Series Waterproof N2 Eyepieces

Using advanced computer design, combinations of low dispersion and high refractive index optical glasses, and durable multilayer deposition coatings, Explore Scientific 82° Series extreme wide field eyepieces are optimized to produce high contrast, high resolution, and superior flat field characteristics. Each 82° Series Nitrogen-Purged Waterproof eyepiece is internally sealed and purged with inert, dry nitrogen gas to prevent internal fogging, to halt the intrusion of fine particulates and fungus, and to maximize the life of the internal coatings.

The visual effect of these eyepieces with their long eye-relief and their 82° apparent field is truly a full-immersion experience. Your eye is relaxed, allowing you to easily use the "averted vision" technique to study faint details across a huge field-of-view. Just check out this animation of how Explore Scientific Eyepieces field of view works and read about how Scott Roberts uses them:

"I now use the 82° Series eyepieces for most of my deep sky work at the telescope. I love the way that objects like M31 in Andromeda, the Orion Nebula, distant galaxies, and beautiful star clusters stretch across the huge field of these eyepieces. I feel more connected with the universe at large and as I study the treasure of stars in my eyepiece I am reminded of the distances and age of the cosmos and the constant discoveries that are being made by professional and amateur astronomers alike.

A larger apparent field of view (AFOV) will produce a larger true field of view (TFOV) if we are comparing different eyepiece designs of the same focal length. Large apparent field eyepieces give you what I call "full- immersion" viewing. With eyepieces that have small apparent fields (like Kellner ("K"), Modified Achromatic ("MA"), Orthoscopic ("OR"), or Huygens ("H") designs) if the eypieces are of good optical quality, the resolution, contrast, magnification, and sharpness will be there, but the observer tends to be more "removed" from the experience of observing the object. You feel like you are looking down a dark tunnel to see the object at the end of the eyepiece, and your eye tends to strain a little as you lock your eye straight down the eyepiece. In visual astronomy, the harder you try to look as you strain your eye, the less you see.

But when you use eyepieces of larger apparent field, you have a much wider visual angle to scan your eye across the image inside the eyepiece. By scanning your eye from edge to edge you can more comfortably and naturally look into the eyepiece, and as you relax your eye, you begin to see finer and fainter details. This "immerses" you into visual experience of astronomy. The experience for many who first use extreme wide angle eyepieces like the 82° Series is often quite overwhelming as they start to really connect with the universe. The cost of such eyepieces is generally more, but experienced observers often feel the expense is worth it.

To calculate the true field-of-view with any eyepiece, first calculate the magnification the eyepiece is producing by dividing the telescope's focal length by the eyepiece's focal length. Then divide the apparent field of view of the eyepiece by the magnification. This will give you a number in degrees of the actual section of the sky that you are seeing through the eyepiece, the true field of view."
-- Scott Roberts

Each eyepiece is meticulously assembled into precision machined metal lens barrels that maintain the perfect alignment of the optical train for years of rugged use in the field. The 82° Series eyepieces come with a twist-up rubber eye-guard that raise to the desired height for the comfort of the observer, and as experienced astronomers know, eye comfort is critical when trying to observe at the visual limits of the telescope. To keep internal reflections to a minimum, all internal surfaces of the eyepiece barrel are flat black, as well as the edges of the lenses themselves to minimize the scattering of light within the lenses themselves.

In today's modern telescope industry there are many fine companies to choose from manufacturing top quality eyepieces. Explore Scientific invites direct side-by-side comparison with any other eyepiece of similar design, and they back their eyepieces with a Lifetime Warranty. We think that you will find Explore Scientific eyepieces rank among the finest obtainable and represent an outstanding value.

Explore Scientific Product Number: EPWP8288-
Additional Information

Additional Information

SKU ES-EPWP8288-01
UPC Code 812257014590
Manufacturer Explore Scientific
Optical Design Wide Angle
Barrel Size 1.25"
Warranty Lifetime Warranty
Eyepiece Field of View - Apparent 82º
Eyepiece Focal Length 8.8mm
Eyepiece Eye Relief Not supplied by manufacturer
Eyepiece Manufacturer Series Explore Scientific 82º Waterproof
Eyepiece Weight 8 oz.
Field Stop Not supplied by manufacturer
Number of Lens Elements & Groups 7 elements in 4 groups
Special Feature Waterproof
Comes with Dust Caps? Yes
Comes with Eye Guard? Yes
Reviews

Customer Reviews 3 item(s)

Great Budget Eypiece
Was able to test this 8.8mm eyepiece on a Celestron CPC1100 last night under way less than ideal conditions viewing Jupiter and was still able to see IO cast a shadow on Jupiter's surface. Transparency, seeing, and clouds were not good, but enough of a break in clouds to see Venus and Jupiter. If you are on a budget this is a great eyepiece compared to other budget eyepieces. Will try a 6.7mm next.
1= Houston, We Have a Problem & 5= It's Out of This World
Review by Milly / (Posted on 7/6/2015)
The best eyepiece in the 82-deg. line of Explore Scientific
The eyepiece provides the best image quality over the 82-deg. ES line. Even in my quite "fast" 1:4.5 Newton I have got crisp image of Moon surface from center of field view till field stop edge. The eyepiece gives pretty view of tiny star clusters. Eye relief could be a bit larger

Great eyepiece!
1= Houston, We Have a Problem & 5= It's Out of This World
Review by Ernest_SPb / (Posted on 3/21/2013)
Great for a F/4.6 356mm
After finally unpacking and assembling my telescope I was left with a couple starter eyepieces, 1.25 10mm plossl and 35mm 3 element 2, that lacked in a few departments. They both were in the 50 degreeish apparent field of view and both were tricky to use. I could see coma with the 35mm and the field when scanning around was noticeably deformed. The 10mm plossl was nice in most situations but was nowhere near the 35mm in focus and required that I move the telescope frequently to view. I also had a older Celestron K20mm (Kellner?, which, produced a sharper more contrasty image, albeit reflection city if the image was very bright.
So after researching the vast landscape of eyepieces and reading multiple reviews came to the conclusion that Explore Scientific seem to be in the sweet spot when it comes to price and performance.
I got in my 8.8mm ES 82 degree at the beginning of a run of many great nights of observing. First inspection revealed the eyepiece is much more weighty than any of my other eyepieces and the finish is superb. The waterproof feature is a nice bonus, this eyepiece will require less maintenance to keep performing because of it.
Visually, when compared to my 10mm plossl, there is a difference. Colors are actually toned down a bit (this must be the color correction at work and the images are more contrasty.
Globular's are more stunning, distant galaxy's show more, bright stars are literally amazing, the field is flat and sharp from edge to edge, and the extra weight means the eyepiece holds heat better and doesn't fog up so quickly.
Most importantly, the 82 degree field means I spend less time moving my telescope and sharing the eyepiece with others is easier when I don't have to keep bringing objects back into view.

The only negatives I can see with this eyepiece is that the eyepiece requires that your eye is in a certain spot to see the full field. Otherwise you'll have blackouts. So it takes practice to use, but now that I have put in a number of viewing sessions I have few of those moments and they are not a distraction, occasionally, I purposefully use it to darken objects (Venus and Jupiter before I pull out the filters. This could be because my telescopes low F/4.6 value is making the eyepiece a little more finicky too. I'll see when I get my Powermate 2x if this remains the same.
Hardly worth mentioning but I'm laying it all on the table here. Their is a small teardrop reflection when a really bright star is slightly out of the field. This is because of the first ring being a little too reflective. I'll say that it is not a issue with me and the fixes I have read about are easy to implement. I liken this to a lens flare, a neat characteristic of the eyepiece that rarely shows.

Ultimately, this eyepiece blows away all my other eyepieces and then some. It has made my viewing sessions move to the next level. I'm undoubtedly a fan, I got the 30mm coming in the mail, the 4.7mm is next, and don't get me started on the 100 degree series (droooool
1= Houston, We Have a Problem & 5= It's Out of This World
Review by 2orthern2ights / (Posted on 10/14/2012)
Included Items

Included Items

  • Explore Scientific 8.8mm 82° Series Waterproof Eyepiece
  • Twist-up Rubber Eyeguard
Questions & Answers

Product Questions

Is this eyepiece threaded for a filter?
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